Recent Tweets @

Inspired by a friend of mine, here is a brief tutorial on the most efficient way to mix alcohol and carbs. (And yes, I know that almost all of the alcohol in beer bread evaporates during cooking, that’s why you have a second can while you’re baking it!)

image

This is a very simple beer bread recipe, with only three ingredients. It is, however, endlessly versatile in its variations. Now pay attention! 

Read More

1/8 Gates, an awesome photo series! 

brooklynmutt:

Never gets old.

think-progress:

Good use of time

As a poor person without cable, I was unaware until today of the White House tours being canceled, but very aware of the cuts to all those other programs. Maybe TV really does make you stupider. 

(via wilwheaton)

intothebeautifulnew:

Ladies, take Nervine!  The key ingredient was bromide (a sedative & anti-convulsant); bromines today are used in pesticides, disinfectants, flame retardants, as a gasoline additive, etc.  Miles Medical began around 1885 and operated for years; Nervine was around until the 60s.  

The people today who idolize the self-sacrificing and completely home-oriented housewives of the past often fail to realize the key factor that made these women’s lives work: they were blitzed out of their minds, like, constantly. “Oh, Timmy’s set himself on fire? Good thing I have my Nervine!” 

(via vintascope)

funnyordie:

Guide to the Papal Smoke Colors

As a new pope is being chosen, smoke billows from the Sistine Chapel in indicate whether the Roman Catholic cardinals have made a decision.

Here’s a handy guide to what each color means.

Heck yeah, Nora Roberts! (Though in the interest of full disclosure, Blue Smoke was her only post-1995-or-so novel that I started and did not finish because it was too damn grim. Way too many people getting set on fire!) 

(via dr-archeville)

Day Twenty-Eight: Silence
This is a photograph of the anechoic chamber at Orfield Labs in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It holds the Guinness Record for quietest room in the world. Picture a nice, quiet nighttime room for sleeping in. That’s about 30 decibels, on average. The atmosphere in the anechoic chamber is -9 decibels. It has no sound, and it deadens sound that is produced in it. 
The anechoic chamber is a strange place. After just a few minutes in the chamber, you start to hear your own heart beating and the functioning of your organs. There is nothing else to focus on, so you hear yourself more clearly than you ever have before. After half an hour, the silence leads to severe disorientation, and you had better be sitting down or you’ll probably fall. After just forty-five minutes of silence, you may begin hallucinating as your sensory-starved brain creates things for you to listen to. Thus far nobody has made it beyond an hour or so in the chamber. A little silence is nice, but it’s easy to get too much of a good thing. 

Day Twenty-Eight: Silence

This is a photograph of the anechoic chamber at Orfield Labs in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It holds the Guinness Record for quietest room in the world. Picture a nice, quiet nighttime room for sleeping in. That’s about 30 decibels, on average. The atmosphere in the anechoic chamber is -9 decibels. It has no sound, and it deadens sound that is produced in it. 

The anechoic chamber is a strange place. After just a few minutes in the chamber, you start to hear your own heart beating and the functioning of your organs. There is nothing else to focus on, so you hear yourself more clearly than you ever have before. After half an hour, the silence leads to severe disorientation, and you had better be sitting down or you’ll probably fall. After just forty-five minutes of silence, you may begin hallucinating as your sensory-starved brain creates things for you to listen to. Thus far nobody has made it beyond an hour or so in the chamber. A little silence is nice, but it’s easy to get too much of a good thing. 

Day Twenty-Seven: Happy

Nobody is smiling, but everyone involved in this picture is very happy! Robert is happy because he can play with the Model A and make an astonishingly loud AAAOOOGAAAH noise on the hornn whenever he likes. Nana is very happy to have Robert around, because they are very best buddies. And I am unspeakably happy that I don’t have to deal with this situation for real for another thirteen years. 

Day Twenty-Six: Ate

In 2008, my paternal grandmother, my last surviving grandparent, passed away after a long struggle with Alzheimer’s Disease. It was during my last semester of law school, a time when I was already struggling, and I remember it as a very difficult, sad period in my life. During the weekend we were at home for the funeral, I used my little Flip Video camera to record both big occasions and small moments in time. 

It’s really only now, going back and looking at all the raw bits of footage, that I can see the beauty and the strength in that time period as well. The whole family came together, and though there were many tears, there was also laughter and support and good memories being made. Many of those good memories were centered around the plethora of food that surrounds the grieving process. For three days, the extended family was together for nearly every meal. The many meals we ate together helped us to face saying goodbye. 

Day Twenty-Five: Faithful
My maternal grandparents were married more than fifty years. I don’t remember how many, but I was pretty young when they had their big party, so it was a lot. In the last years of her life, my grandmother suffered a series of strokes, each of which left her with progressively less of the person she used to be. Eventually she was barely responsive and in a nursing home, seemingly unaware of most of what went on around her, and not knowing any of the people who loved her. Despite all of this, my grandfather was with her every single day, caring for her, tending to her, just being with her till the very end. I don’t think I could’ve had a finer example of faithfulness growing up. 

Day Twenty-Five: Faithful

My maternal grandparents were married more than fifty years. I don’t remember how many, but I was pretty young when they had their big party, so it was a lot. In the last years of her life, my grandmother suffered a series of strokes, each of which left her with progressively less of the person she used to be. Eventually she was barely responsive and in a nursing home, seemingly unaware of most of what went on around her, and not knowing any of the people who loved her. Despite all of this, my grandfather was with her every single day, caring for her, tending to her, just being with her till the very end. I don’t think I could’ve had a finer example of faithfulness growing up.